Free, Loss of Curve

Degeneration and Abnormal Curve

“Five hundred digital sets of standing A-P lumbo-pelvic and lateral lumbar radiographic images were randomly selected according to a computer-generated list and analyzed retrospectively from a pool of approximately 1300 radiographic series in the RMIT University Teaching Clinic archives. All radiographs were de-identified except for.

By Jan 1,2018

“Five hundred digital sets of standing A-P lumbo-pelvic and lateral lumbar radiographic images were randomly selected according to a computer-generated list and analyzed retrospectively from a pool of approximately 1300 radiographic series in the RMIT University Teaching Clinic archives. All radiographs were de-identified except for date of birth, gender and date of examination. One hundred ninety nine sets of images were excluded due to the following reasons: evidence of trauma; congenital developmental abnormalities such as transitional vertebrae; visible evidence of orthopedic surgery; leg length discrepancy; scoliosis; isthmic spondylolisthesis; fractures; tumors or any condition other than DJD; and poor image quality.”

“We found a highly significant curvilinear correlation between lordosis and DJD of the lower lumbar spine in both sexes, but especially in women, irrespective of the effects of age. We found the effect size of lordosis on lower lumbar DJD to be between 17.4 and 18.1% in women and 12.9% in older men. In addition, lordosis of 65 (95% CI 55.3–77.7) and 68 (98% CI 58.7–73.3) degrees were associated with minimal DJD in the lower lumbar spine of women and men respectively, and were therefore considered ‘optimal’. This optimal lordotic angle was 73 (95% CI 58.8–87.2) degrees in older men.”

 

 “In all the groups studied (except in young men), hypolordosis showed a slightly stronger correlation with lower lumbar DJD. It should also be noted that in older men this correlation was much stronger for hypo-lordosis than for hyper-lordosis” (Doctor, our care can PREVENT arthritis.)

 

“It is important to determine the ‘ideal’ or ‘optimal’ sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine in order to prevent or manage overloading of intervertebral discs and facet joints that may contribute to DJD. It has long been known that decreased lordosis increases the load on the intervertebral discs and increased lordosis increases the load on the facet joints ” (Make sure you measure the spine on xrays) 

“it is known that increased pelvic incidence (PI), which increases lumbar lordosis, correlates with DJD of the facet joints , which in turn is associated with low back pain”

 

“postural changes that alter the lumbar lordosis within this ‘normal’ range are likely to significantly change the load distribution of compressive forces over the spinal joints and lead to DJD.”

 

“This makes lumbar lordosis a potential therapeutic target for exercise rehabilitation and ergonomic intervention”

 

Conclusions

We report here that DJD in the lower lumber spine is closely correlated with deviations of lumbar lordosis ..

 

BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2017; 18: 330.

Published online 2017 Aug 1.

Characterisation of the correlation between standing lordosis and degenerative joint disease in the lower lumbar spine in women and men: a radiographic study

Kelvin J. Murray,1 Michael R. Le Grande,2,3 Arantxa Ortega de Mues,4 and Michael F. Azari1

 

 

 

Lumbar curve and Pain.

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